PIMPAGE: Cutting it a bit fine

Could so easily describe my tendency with deadlines…

Issue 301 of the Judge Dredd Megazine hits newsstands and all good magazine retailers today, containing amongst other things part two of my interview with Carlos Ezquerra. At 15,000 words in total, these features probably represent the biggest single writing endeavour of my life (if you exclude that crappy half-finished book that’s thankfully confined to my busted PC’s hard drive). This episode focuses on his early work, and how he found himself moving from the ramblas of Barcelona to the suburbs of Croydon – artist and comic book historian David Roach was a massive help, digging up some really nice examples of Carlos’ work from the very beginning of his career.

While I’m sure you’ll agree that my fascinating insights are more than enough reason to pick this issue up, there’s also some cracking Neil Googe and Boo Cook artwork to savour… 

301

Part three next month, which I finished writing on Monday. So yeah, cutting it a bit fine.

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PIMPAGE: Cutting it a bit fine

Could so easily describe my tendency with deadlines…

Issue 301 of the Judge Dredd Megazine hits newsstands and all good magazine retailers today, containing amongst other things part two of my interview with Carlos Ezquerra. At 15,000 words in total, these features probably represent the biggest single writing endeavour of my life (if you exclude that crappy half-finished book that’s thankfully confined to my busted PC’s hard drive). This episode focuses on his early work, and how he found himself moving from the ramblas of Barcelona to the suburbs of Croydon – artist and comic book historian David Roach was a massive help, digging up some really nice examples of Carlos’ work from the very beginning of his career.

While I’m sure you’ll agree that my fascinating insights are more than enough reason to pick this issue up, there’s also some cracking Neil Googe and Boo Cook artwork to savour… 

301

Part three next month, which I finished writing on Monday. So yeah, cutting it a bit fine.

The Alpha of the Omega: the Supreme Court’s first birthday

Following on from a post I made about the symbology of the UK’s new Supreme Court,the BBC has taken a look at the impact this ultimate legal authority is having on our democracy. Interesting that we finally have a court that seems willing to assert the principle that the country is governed by the Rule of Law above all else.

And so for many, the constitutional clash of our time is that between an all powerful executive, unchecked by weak parliamentary opposition, and an invigorated, independent judiciary.

Unlike its US counterpart, the UK Supreme Court has no specific statutory power to strike down legislation it considers unlawful, but there is in little our constitutional arrangements to stop it taking that power to itself.

The Alpha of the Omega: the Supreme Court’s first birthday

Following on from a post I made about the symbology of the UK’s new Supreme Court,the BBC has taken a look at the impact this ultimate legal authority is having on our democracy. Interesting that we finally have a court that seems willing to assert the principle that the country is governed by the Rule of Law above all else.

And so for many, the constitutional clash of our time is that between an all powerful executive, unchecked by weak parliamentary opposition, and an invigorated, independent judiciary.

Unlike its US counterpart, the UK Supreme Court has no specific statutory power to strike down legislation it considers unlawful, but there is in little our constitutional arrangements to stop it taking that power to itself.

Talking to Carlos Ezquerra

300

Last October I had the very great privilege of meeting one of the most important people in the entire comic book industry. Carlos Ezquerra is responsible for helping create – along with writer John Wagner – two of the most iconic characters in British comics: futuristic facist lawman Judge Dredd and mutated bounty hunter Johnny Alpha for 2000 AD.

The first installment of my interview with him has now been published in Issue 300 of the Judge Dredd Megazine. We kick off with his thoughts on Strontium Dog and working with his own son.

It was fantastic to sit on his balcony overlooking the golf courses and sierra skyline of Marbella – his home for half the year – and chat about his career and his life, as he puffed away on cigarillos and we drank a rather refreshing red wine/lemonade mix whose name I apparantly mis-spelled… There’ll be no more cigarillos though, as he has thankfully just survived a brush with lung cancer.

This is just part one of a three part interview – in the next issue, he talks about his early work, which the vast majority of 2000 AD readers will never have seen before.

(It was an awesome trip – my Spanish-speaking mate mate Oliver Redding and I skipped off to Iberia for a week of tapas, beer and interviewing. We also headed up to Valladolid to chat to Jesus Redondo, the product of which appeared in issue 296)

16541_186607356755_546121755_3919959_7843017_n

 

Talking to Carlos Ezquerra

300

Last October I had the very great privilege of meeting one of the most important people in the entire comic book industry. Carlos Ezquerra is responsible for helping create – along with writer John Wagner – two of the most iconic characters in British comics: futuristic facist lawman Judge Dredd and mutated bounty hunter Johnny Alpha for 2000 AD.

The first installment of my interview with him has now been published in Issue 300 of the Judge Dredd Megazine. We kick off with his thoughts on Strontium Dog and working with his own son.

It was fantastic to sit on his balcony overlooking the golf courses and sierra skyline of Marbella – his home for half the year – and chat about his career and his life, as he puffed away on cigarillos and we drank a rather refreshing red wine/lemonade mix whose name I apparantly mis-spelled… There’ll be no more cigarillos though, as he has thankfully just survived a brush with lung cancer.

This is just part one of a three part interview – in the next issue, he talks about his early work, which the vast majority of 2000 AD readers will never have seen before.

(It was an awesome trip – my Spanish-speaking mate mate Oliver Redding and I skipped off to Iberia for a week of tapas, beer and interviewing. We also headed up to Valladolid to chat to Jesus Redondo, the product of which appeared in issue 296)

16541_186607356755_546121755_3919959_7843017_n